Tell Us Why Women Need a Voice in Agriculture & You Could Win Registration for Advancing Women

Thumbs-up-for-Advancing-Women-contestWe are so excited to be partnering with the Advancing Women Conference to give away 1 (one) registration to the Toronto event this fall! We know there are many women in our industry who would benefit from attending this incredible event. Unfortunately, perhaps not all have the means, so we want to make sure one lucky individual does!

Here’s how you win:

  • In the comments below this post, explain, in 140 words or so, why you feel women need a voice in agriculture today.*
  • Tweet about your answer with a link back to this post. Here’s a nice, short url you can paste into your tweet: http://wp.me/p5xs9y-1Z
  • Remember to use the hashtags #womeninag so we can find your tweet
  • Be sure to follow us on Twitter and subscribe to receive blog and event updates
  • Be willing to tweet during the Advancing Women Conference and write a blog post afterwards about your “top 3 takeaways”

Contest closes Friday, August 28 at midnight. The winner will be chosen by the Ag Women’s Network executive team based on the following criteria:

  • Passion and sincerity
  • Creativity and depth of thought
  • Structure of answer and clarity of idea

The winner will be contacted no later than September 4, 2015. Winner is responsible for making travel and lodging arrangements at the conference. Prize includes conference registration only (approximately value of $540). Unfortunately, only new registrants will be eligible to win. Ie. We will not be reimbursing any registration costs already incurred. Winners must be 18 years of age or older in the province in which they reside. Legally, here’s some other stuff we need to tell you.

* Your comment may be used in future communications (website, email or social) by the Ag Women’s Network.

The Advancing Women Conference – East is being held October 5-6, 2015 at the Weston Harbour Castle in Toronto. Farm and Food Care Ontario is sponsoring transportation from London and Kingston. Don’t miss the premier ag women’s networking and leadership development event this side of the prairies!
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10 thoughts on “Tell Us Why Women Need a Voice in Agriculture & You Could Win Registration for Advancing Women

  1. Women need a voice in Agriculture more and more because there is more of us now, yet we aren’t taken as seriously as we should be ! Its not just an old boys club anymore, we are just as knowledgeable and can run a farm or business just as well as any man. Being a young woman in Agriculture, I was able to draw a “Wow, that’s incredible!” when I told Premier Wynne that I was at a meeting representing my local Ag Federation, and she is the former Ag Minister! If that doesn’t show how much ground we still need to cover, I don’t know what does.

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  2. Women are involved in agriculture as sales consultants, agronomists, accountants, marketers, researchers and veterinarians in addition to their traditional roles as mothers, wives and partners. We have made great strides towards increased diversity and it shows, particularly in introductory and mid-level roles. Unfortunately, that does not translate easily into leadership positions. Many studies show companies with more women in leadership roles outperform their counterparts with fewer women. Not only will more women in leadership benefit the companies but of course more women in leadership creates more opportunities for women. This is why I believe women need a voice in agriculture, we need to be empowered and encouraged to assume those leadership positions. More women leaders will bring diverse viewpoints lead to better collaboration and innovation. We will need the passion and engagement women bring to agriculture to face the challenges of the next century.

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  3. I think it is almost redundant to say that women are important in agriculture and need to have an equal voice and status within the industry.

    In Canada, women work alongside men on boards, in businesses, and are visible in all parts of the agricultural sector. This has changed greatly in the twenty years since I entered the industry, where I was a bit of a novelty in the seed industry in Western Canada. Now women are everywhere. That’s not saying there isn’t still work to do – there is, but I believe that our voice should be used to help other women achieve what we take for granted.

    Women in developing countries very rarely have a voice, sometimes even not a face. In Africa, women account for more than 60% of the farmers, yet very few get paid, can own land, can access credit or be educated. Yet hundreds of studies show when women farmers to learn and earn, they spend their money on increasing their children’s level of education, nutrition and health, thus ultimately increasing their overall standard of living.

    One of the important roles we have as women in agriculture is to give others the same voice.

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  4. Believe it or not, our agricultural industry is already run by ‘women’! Our Cows, Ewes, Hens, & Sows are the very breath of our business, and it is upon their remarkably unique ability to create life that we rely.

    A woman may be many different things throughout her lifetime; a daughter, a sister, an aunt, a friend… a mother. Over the past century we have developed & honed our voice as women and have persevered for stable footing as honest equals to our men. While we must, and do, embrace this equality to our fullest ability, we must also celebrate that which makes us uniquely capable as famers & active members of our Ag Industry. It is in this, perhaps the singularly most phenomenal part of life, that women can provide a unique understanding & perspective to what might otherwise be overlooked as the mundane, as a necessity.

    We have a voice, but we can’t just speak. We must sing. We must dance, paint, show our passion & forever enthrall with what our perspective can offer the world & our industry.

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  5. Women belong in leadership positions in agriculture and farming. Period. Their constant need to seek knowledge and push boundaries will not only help individuals move forward but allow the industry to constantly improve. Communities need to work together, embrace awkwardness and uncertainty, and strive for an environment where all will succeed. Women understand competition, survival and rebuilding on a continual basis. We need to have the ability to try, fail, get back up and try again. Our passion is what drives us to seek new opportunities, improve existing networks and systems, and get things accomplished. Agriculture is a resource based industry that needs to not only develop crops and livestock but our workforce as well. Cultivating women and their varied skill sets will improve not only Canadian agriculture but the global farming community as well. I can. We can.

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  6. Women in agriculture need a voice because so many do so much, yet are so often unseen. Every day, women work along side everyone else on farms, putting their sweat, tears and passion into making their farm successful and viable in every possible way. So often women are so busy making dinner, taking the kids to 4H or running into town to grab something that they brush off how much they do and how important it is. Many women in agriculture are natural communicators, nurturers and multitaskers and this lends itself so well to helping to explain to the public about farming, farm practices and why what we do is so important. Women need a strong voice so that they can feel comfortable to step up and be a vital link of helping communicate what is happening on farms, why it’s happening, and why it’s so important to support farms and farmers – all while putting in a seed order, bouncing a baby and answering a question about their farm on twitter.

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  7. Women need a stronger voice in agriculture today because we have something to say! We are tired of living in the vacuum of ought to’s and should do’s and being ruled by other peoples’ standards and controlled by their expectations, or our need for perfection. We are ready to follow our values, to find our meaning, to use our strengths and express our personalities. We are ready to move from being a Slave Girl to being the Queen. We are ready to use the power of intention everyday and to be energized by the work we do! What better place for us to use our talents than in agriculture? The industry that feed us all is ready for more women to become leaders. We are ready to take risks, make mistakes, start out as beginners and see where this road will lead!

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  8. I think that women need a voice in agriculture today more than ever. The agricultural industry is changing to meet growing demands. We need women to have a voice in agriculture to inspire the next generation, to show girls what my dad taught me: that we can do anything that boys can do on the farm. As a student leader in the Ontario Agricultural College, I look around my classroom to see that the majority are women. We need to have a voice in agriculture because we are just as educated and experienced as the boys sitting in the same classroom. We are powerful. We are compassionate. We are caring. We are innovators in this technological advancing industry. We are inspiring. We are proud that “Farmers Feed Cities”. We are part of the future. We are women working in agriculture who need our voices heard.

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  9. Over the past 20 years we have witnessed the cultivation of an “alternative food system”—one which aims to produce and distribute food in ways that uphold quality, biodiversity, farmer sovereignty, and environmental sensitivity.
    Interestingly, this progressive movement is animated largely by women! But when we think of the big names, we list Joel Salatin, Jean-Martin Fortier, Dan Barber, and Mark Shepard. This mirrors a paradox in much of the work world, where women’s work underpin empires, but men are the spokespersons. Women are pouring their sweat into this blossoming system and have boundless knowledge to share.
    If this “alternative” food system seriously aims to transform the agriculture status quo and create a more socially-just food system, it needs to address structural inequality and provide women the chance to lead and to own their empires!

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  10. Pingback: Announcing the Advancing Women Conference Contest Winner! | Ag Women's Network

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